The Buzz Cut: The Victoria’s Secret 2019 Fashion Show Is Canceled

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Nov 23, 2019

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(Image credit: Timothy A. Clary/Getty Images)

In The Buzz Cutwe bring you a round-up of all the weird, controversial, and wonderful stories we’ve been reading all week.


In a move that will surprise no one, given the lingerie brand’s increasingly out-of-touch stance toward inclusivity, Victoria’s Secret has canceled its annual fashion show this year, citing a need “to evolve the marketing” — probably to woo back the 75% of viewers the event lost between its first, 2001 show and it’s last, 2018 show. Good luck trying to get them back from Savage x Fenty, VS.

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Emilia Clarke recently spoke up about how many directors expect and pressure her to go nude on screen, following her occasionally nude appearance on HBO’s Game of Thrones as Daenerys Targaryen. “I’ve had fights on set before where I’m like, ‘No, the sheet stays up,’ and they’re like, ‘You don’t wanna disappoint your Game of Thrones fans.’ And I’m like, ‘F–you’,” she said in a recent episode of Dax Shepard’s Armchair Expert podcast.

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Marie Kondo, Japanese organizing consultant, author of Spark Joy, host of Netflix’s Tidying Up With Marie Kondo, and a thorn in the backside of hoarders across the world, is ready with her next venture. After inspiring thousands across the world to clean up their homes and own less, Kondo has launched an e-commerce shop with highly curated lifestyle products designed to — you guessed it — spark joy. If this isn’t irony, then what is?

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One of the five women who accused comedian Louis C.K. of sexual misconduct in a 2017 New York Times report has come forward publicly for the first time in response to an op-ed by a male Toronto comedy-club owner who claims the women consented to the comedian masturbating in front of them. “We never agreed nor asked him to take all his clothes off and masturbate to completion in front of us. But it didn’t matter because the exciting part for him was the fear on our faces,” she writes.

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It’s that time of the year again when Oxford Dictionary declares the word of the year — a word (or an expression) that reflects the ethos or mood of the passing year. This year, it’s not #NotAllMen (sorry guys); it’s “climate emergency.” In fact, so grave was our collective panic over global warming and climate change this year, that Oxford’s entire shortlist for the award consisted only of words related to the environment.

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Comedian Sacha Baron Cohen turned serious during his speech at the Anti-Defamation League’s summit on anti-Semitism and hate this week as he identified “the greatest propaganda machine in history”: social media in general, but Facebook more than the rest. Facebook, which has stridently resisted imposing restrictions on even false and/or misleading political ads (even as Twitter and Google set limits on the same), has defended its stance as freedom of speech. Cohen called that defense “ludicrous” and issued a blisteringly eloquent takedown worth a whole read.

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A good read for anyone who hates actress Kristin Stewart: a profile that reads more like an apologia might make you reconsider that stance. It argues that while she and Twilight co-star Robert Pattinson have enjoyed similar, highly successful career trajectories since their launch in the star-crossed vampire blockbuster, audiences have allowed him to move on, but not her. And whose fault is that, really?

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As the wave of unionization in digital media picks up, U.S. workers in journalism, advertising, and publishing industries have anonymously started posting their salary information on crowdsourced spreadsheets, which now have thousands of entries, in the hope that pay transparency will lead to higher and more equal compensation.

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The latest season of Netflix’s Queer Eye is set in Japan, and while the Fab Five have become a cultural phenomenon in America, the show’s latest edition is facing quite a bit of flak for being culturally insensitive and for imposing American ideas onto a society with disparate and complicated cultural norms. “At best, it was a culturally tone-deaf exercise. And at worst, it was cultural imperialism,” writes Natasha Noman for NBC News.

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Earlier this year, social workers in Karnataka filed an RTI on incidents of parents returning adopted kids to the state. The RTI response confirmed their observations — of the 6,650 children adopted by Indian families between 2017 and 2019, 4% (278) were returned. Fatima Khan’s deep dive for The Print unearths why the disturbing trend, also known as “disruption,” is picking up steam in India.

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The Baltimore Museum of Art has decided to make a bold step to correct the gender imbalance in art: in 2020, the museum will only purchase works made by female-identifying artists. In addition, each of the 22 exhibits on view will have a female-centric focus. “You don’t just purchase one painting by a female artist of color and hang it on the wall next to a painting by Mark Rothko. To rectify centuries of imbalance, you have to do something radical,” museum director Christopher Bedford told The Baltimore Sun.

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Written By The Swaddle Team

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